Category Archives: Tips for Home Buyers

A Great Real Estate Agent

A Great Real Estate Agent

Not all real estate agents are created equal. Like all industries, there are plenty of terrific pros, but once in a while a bad apple rubs a buyer or seller the wrong way and spoils it for the rest of us.

If you’ve had a bad experience in the past, don’t let it happen again. If you aren’t comfortable with your current agent, stop everything. You can find wonderful agents in every market — don’t move forward until you have.

Once you find an exceptional real estate agent, you’ll discover plenty of reasons to be thankful for them.

They’ll be there for you during the difficult moments

In the middle of a transaction that seems to be giving you more heartache than love? Maybe it’s not the “deal” you thought it was, or something just doesn’t seem right?

A good agent will take your call at 10 p.m., hear you out and support your decision not to move ahead. Buying or selling a home is a serious financial transaction — not to mention one with huge emotional and practical considerations.

Your agent should uncover any issues and, if it’s the best decision, suggest backing out of the deal before you even bring it up. They’ll be on your side, and looking to build a long-term relationship — not just make a quick buck.

They’ll help get your house ready for sale in record time

A good listing agent doubles as a project manager, designer, and connector of all things quick and fast for home improvement.

Thinking of selling, but daunted by the idea of prepping your home, making necessary fixes or simply deep cleaning? Good listing agents take on the burden and alleviate unnecessary drama from an already stressful time in your life.

With your approval, your agent can muster up a team of painters, stagers, floor finishers, home organizers — and the list goes on. As the lead on prepping your home for sale, your agent will be your single point of contact and get the job done quickly.

They know you’re juggling work, kids and all the other parts of your life

A real estate transaction can be so tedious. Someone always wants a random signature or a document notarized. Inspectors and appraisers need to get into the home, and sometimes one of the parties has a last-minute request that you can’t ignore.

A good agent realizes you have a life outside your real estate transaction. She’ll drive to your home late at night or catch you in the lobby of your office building in between your meetings for that important signature. He’ll open doors, get second bids, sometimes pull weeds and even walk your dogs.

Tasked with making your life easier and your transaction as smooth as possible, a good real estate agent is full service 24/7. And they love doing it.

They’ll send you helpful data about your home long after you’ve closed

Some agents do their deals and move on, seeing your purchase or sale as transactional. But good agents know that their services continue long after you close.

Homeowners like to know what’s going on in the market and how their investment has fared over time. Agents see homes in person each week, and can take note of comparable homes and keep their past clients informed about the market.

It’s true you have a lot of information at your fingertips already, but having an active agent keeping you in the loop, without even asking, is the best.

They have the inside track because they’re well-connected and well-liked

Often, deals fall into place because of the strength of the relationships a good agent builds over time. Being well-connected with other agents, bankers, inspectors and deal-makers means they can help you find opportunities off the market, get the attention or time you need, or get your offer to the top of the pack in a competitive bidding situation.

A truly great agent constantly has your interests, wants and needs in mind, and uncovers opportunities to find the house or the buyer of your dreams.

If you’ve found your dream agent, you have a lot for which to be thankful. If you haven’t, find a good agent and get them on your team. They can make all the difference.

 

BY BRENDON DESIMONE

 

I strive to always do my best for you, and communicate everyday to keep you informed and give you the advantage.

Tracy

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Buying a Home This Fall?

Buying a Home This Fall?

autumn-homes

DenisTangneyJr/iStock

Buying a Home This Fall?

Spring might be the most popular time to buy a home, but there’s a real case to be made for fall: It’s cooler, so you’ll have less competition at the open houses. Because it’s considered the off-season, you’re more likely to get (or make) a deal. And, with the season’s variable weather, you can get a good idea of what the home’s like in hot and cool times alike.

After all, you’re buying a home that will fit your needs in every season—even if you can only scope it out during one.

That means you need to look for things “that aren’t as noticeable in the fall as they might be in the winter or summer months,” says Realtor® Andrea Davitt of Lauer Realty Group in Madison, WI.

Want to make sure that amazing autumnal escape continues to be fantastic year-round? Keep these six things in mind.

1. Check out the air conditioner

First: Does the place even have an air conditioner? This might be easy to spot if you’re house hunting during unseasonably warm temps. But if the weather’s already turned, heed this: The air might be cool now, but it won’t be forever. And with summer nine (long!) months away, it’s easy to forget to check.

If the home does have AC, you’ll want to give the unit a thorough inspection. Your inspector will likely examine the system to make sure it’s functioning, but it never hurts to run a few tests yourself—or even call an HVAC specialist.

Davitt recommends first checking to see if the AC’s filter has been recently changed. Then try turning down the thermostat and see if the unit runs. Meanwhile, make sure air is blowing through all the vents—it’s better to find blockages now, with time to fix them, than at the beginning of summer when sweat’s starting to pool. Check out the outdoor condenser, listening for any strange sounds, and make sure the condensation line in the evaporator coil—likely found in the furnace—is flowing smoothly. Last, examine the ductwork, looking for any rusting or poor fittings.

2. How’s the drainage?

Gutters are the obvious thing to check, Davitt says. In the interlude between the rainy and snowy seasons, don’t forget to check the drainage. In the yard, look for areas where water is accumulating in small puddles, which could indicate a leak in buried pipes or grading problems that need to be addressed before the rainy season.

If it looks like the sewer might be clogged, bring out a professional sewer inspector to do a camera inspection of the line. That can reveal problems that could cause a backup—as well as a world’s worth of annoyances later. Better to know before you buy.

3. Note the surroundings

What’s nearby? Look across the street, behind you, and next door. Are there bulldozers and cranes? Empty lots awaiting brand spankin’ new homes? Ask your neighbors about seasonal street construction nearby—there’s nothing worse than having a peaceful, quiet home all winter until work begins with a literal bang in the spring.

Double up on the investigative work if you’re near a large intersection, or if your home is directly connected to a major road. Going door to door is not only a good way to meet your future neighbors—it’s also a novel way to find out what seasonal surprises lay ahead.

4. Look for slopes

How steep is your driveway? Sure, it’s easy to navigate now—but will it be when it’s covered in ice?

A less-than-ideal driveway shouldn’t automatically disqualify a home, but it’s better to know in advance if late-winter parking is going to be a challenge.

Similarly, Davitt recommends checking out the landscaping’s pitch around your new home’s exterior. Are there any steep hills that might cause water runoff and flooding? What about the area around your basement? If land slopes toward your basement, it could indicate potential flooding.

5. Check out standing water

At the end of the summer, we’re all just happy that the mosquitoes have died or moved on to bother poor souls elsewhere. But they’ll be back—and you should know in advance where they’ll be hanging out.

“We’ll look for anything that holds standing water,” Davitt says.

Most of these are movable: trash cans, buckets, birdbaths. But if your home is located on a lake or small pond, there’s not a whole lot you can do besides prepare yourself mentally and invest in bug spray and citronella.

If you’re buying in fall or winter, when bugs are hiding, keep in mind the potential ramifications of living on the water.

6. Examine the windows

If the windows in your potential home are older (or don’t even open), you’ll want to replace them immediately—otherwise you risk wasting energy or even breaking them in a freeze.

But if winter is coming quickly, there might not be time. In those cases, Davitt recommends putting plastic over the windows until you’re in a position to replace them.

Will you need storm windows? Find out in advance.

“If you’ve only lived in an apartment, you don’t know you have to change out your screens,” Davitt says.

That can be an added expense and stressor, and one that’s better to know in advance.

Don’t let fall’s peaceful, chilly weather lull you into a false sense of security. When you’re buying a home, examine everything that can go wrong—even if the rainy winter or spring seem far away.

By
Jamie Wiebe Realtor.com

 

11053371_383914575115047_8548886157930102220_nTracy Tkac Evers & Co Real Estate 301-437-8722

 

Aging In Place

Aging In Place

When you’re in your 40s and 50s, it may seem too early to worry about what life will be like post-retirement. But if you are shopping for a place to settle down, the home you choose today will impact your options years down the road and be comfortable while aging in place. Here are some factors to consider before buying your next home — particularly if you plan to spend the rest of your life there.

Is the neighborhood walkable?

The best homes for aging in place are centrally located and allow you to either walk or take public transit wherever you need to go.

A walkable neighborhood is safe for pedestrians, with well-maintained and well-lit sidewalks. It is close to retail stores, restaurants and grocery stores. Bonus points if it is near your doctor and pharmacy. As you age, you will love not having to drive everywhere.

Are there local social opportunities?

A strong community makes aging in place fun. You will want your new community to offer plenty of things to do and people to meet.

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Look for parks, libraries, museums and places of worship. Keep an eye out for community centers with interesting classes and volunteer opportunities.

As you get older, these resources will become even more important. You will want access to fun things to do no matter what your age.

Is it the right size?

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You may love the looks of that big house with its sprawling green lawn, but are you prepared to maintain it? The bigger the house, the more upkeep it needs.

If you become unable to take care of the home yourself, are you able to hire a landscape or home maintenance company?

Moving can be the perfect time to downsize so you have less space to manage.

Is it accessible?

You want your new home to be easy to live in both now and during your retirement. That means you will need to check the accessibility of the property you are considering. You will want your new home to have:

  • A single-story layout, with no entry stairs
  • No random steps in the house to trip over
  • Thresholds that are flush with the floor
  • Wide walkways
  • Plenty of lighting
  • Extra floor space for easy maneuverability
  • A walk-in shower with a seat
  • Storage space that is not difficult to reach
  • Counters that are neither too low or too high

If you struggle with the house now, it will only get worse as you age. You can renovate the home, but it’s not worth fighting against a house that is simply too tight and small. Find a home that you’re comfortable in.

Can you modify it for aging in place?

House hunting can make you feel like Goldilocks trying to find a house that is just right. What if you have found a house you love, but it isn’t designed with accessibility in mind?

If that’s the case, some easy renovations can transform your new home into the perfect setting to age in place:

  • Add handrails to both outdoor and indoor stairs to help you keep your balance.
  • Replace round doorknobs with lever handles that are easier to open.
  • Add non-slip surfaces in the bathtub and shower to prevent falls.
  • Install handrails in the bathroom next to the toilet and bathtub for extra support.
  • Choose chairs and sofas with back support and sturdy armrests.
  • Install more lighting for better visibility, both outdoors and indoors.
  • Choose countertops and tables with rounded edges.

Keep your plan in mind

Make life easier for yourself: Choose a home that will support you as you age. That means a place that is comfortable now and that will continue to be comfortable when you are older.

Keep your aging in place plan in mind as you house hunt, and you are sure to find a house that can be your home for years to come.

by ARAR HAN- Zillow

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Buying Basics

 

Buying Basics

GetMedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

Buying a home can feel overwhelming, and a lot of that uneasiness can come from not understanding how to get a mortgage. This guide — which includes 20 questions to ask lenders — should help clarify the mortgage process and get you on the road to homeownership.

Determine your affordability

Before you start working with a real estate agent, it’s important to understand how much home you can afford. This will help you and your agent target your search, and you’ll avoid the heartache of falling in love with a property that’s out of your reach.

You can determine affordability in seconds using two different mortgage calculators. First use an affordability calculator to determine a purchase price appropriate for your income and down payment; then use a payment calculator to determine your exact monthly obligations.

Get started on your mortgage process

Next, you’ll actually connect with a lender to apply for a loan, and the lender will review all of your qualifying documentation. A loan officer will ask you to provide the items below — verbally or in an online form first, then with full documentation:

  • Personal information. Date of birth, marital status, number of children and ages.
  • Residence history. Rent payment or all mortgage, insurance and tax figures — for at least the past two years.
  • Employment and income. Documentation showing wages and employment history for at least two years. If you receive commissions or bonuses, you’ll need two years of figures. Lenders average variable and self-employed income over two years. Full tax returns for two years are usually required.
  • Asset balances. All checking, savings, investment and retirement accounts. You must provide all information for accounts, even if you’re only using one account for the down payment (you lender will need to see a paper trail for large deposits and withdrawals). If you’re using gift funds for your down payment, specific rules apply.
  • Debt payments and balances. Credit cards, mortgages, student loans, car loans, alimony and child support.
  • Social Security number. For a credit report to confirm your debts and credit scores.

Select down payment and loan type

Once your lender has your full profile, he or she can recommend loan structures based on your situation.

Perhaps your income is strong, but you’re early in your career and haven’t saved up that much money. In this case, your lender might recommend a 10-percent down payment because the slightly higher payments fit your budget and enable you to conserve cash.

Or you might start the process thinking you want to buy a 1-bedroom condo using a 5-year adjustable-rate mortgage because you think you’re going to sell the home and upgrade within five years. But your lender may look at your income and consider that you want to start a family within three years, then determine that you can afford the monthly budget and cash to close on a 3-bedroom single family home using a 30-year fixed loan.

It’s important to match your loan terms and home buying choices with your objectives. Because lenders require your full financial profile, they are in a good position to help you explore and fine-tune your objectives to make sure you select the loan type that fits you best.

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Find an agent and start home shopping

After you’ve begun the mortgage process,

call Tracy Tkac- 301-437-8722  and begin your home search.

Introduce your lender to your agent, and ask your lender to brief your agent on your mortgage process. This will verify your target home price and down payment for your agent and show that you’re ready to close as soon as you find a home.

Write offers, lock your rate and finalize your loan

Once you find a home you love, you’ll write an offer. Your agent will present your offer to the seller, and if the seller accepts your offer, your loan process will move to the final approval phase.

Your lender will inform you that it’s time to lock your rate. A rate lock runs with a borrower and a property, so you can’t lock your rate until a seller has accepted your offer.

Then your lender will request any updated documentation needed from you, order an appraisal on the property and review the property title report.

Once all of these items check out, your lender will draw final loan documents with your desired rate and terms for you to sign. Your lender will fund the loan, and the home will be yours!

20Qs-Mortgage_Zillow_a_02

 

7239 Addington Dr, Mc Lean, VA

FOR SALE Single Family House

$1,797,000 6 Beds, 5.5 Baths

  • Laundry In-Unit

Parking
Garage / 2 Spaces
Sq Footage
6046 sqft.
Lot Size
5828 Square Feet
Floors
4

Description

OPEN Sunday August 2 1-4pm
REMARKABLE $98,000.00 REDUCTION! Coveted DETACHED home in gated Evans Farm feat. 4 fin. levels & ELEVATOR. Former model home has slew of upgrades, plantation shutters, gracious rear deck w/ brick pavers & trellis. Chef’s kit w high-end appliances & grand island. High ceil. in Palatial Owner’s suite w gas fireplace. Epic M.Bath w/ XL shower, dual water closets & dual vanities. FINISHED daylight basement. 2 Car Garage.

Make These Changes Immediately

11053371_383914575115047_8548886157930102220_n
Great list, especially changing the locks and batteries to all of the smoke alarms.couple moving in to new house, drinking champagne

Gary Burchell/Getty Images

The moving frenzy never ends: Even after you close, the to-do lists drag on and on—endless pages of bullet points that keep you up at night when all you want is to begin your new life. Some of them are fun, like redecorating and buying new furniture.

“When you move into a new house, you’re more concerned with decorating and taking stuff out you don’t like,” says Kevin Minto, president of Signet Home Inspections in Grass Valley, CA. “But let’s not forget about the less romantic things that are mundane—but more important in the long run.”

Once you’ve got the keys, feel free to give yourself a break. You deserve it! But don’t rest on your laurels too long—and make sure to do these eight things right away.

1. Change the locks

Before moving even one tiny piece of furniture into your new home, change the locks—or at least have them rekeyed. It’s not that you don’t trust the sellers (who are, we’re sure, perfectly respectable and upstanding citizens). It’s that you shouldn’t trust everyone who’s had contact with those keys over the years, any of whom could have copied the keys for some unsavory purpose.

2. Change the alarm batteries

Making sure your fire and carbon monoxide detectors have fresh batteries may not seemlike a pressing issue while you’re in the middle of a stressful move (and aren’t they all), but it’s the kind of thing that gets ignored and then forgotten. Better to deal with it now, when the home is empty and you can make a quick sweep of the house—without lugging a ladder around furniture.

3. Review your home inspector’s report

Can’t find your inspector’s report? Minto says reports are often filed with the escrow papers—but don’t wait until something goes wrong to pull them out. A good home inspector will outline the most important issues in their report, so use their expertise as a guide for your first few days of ownership. If they’ve marked anything as particularly pressing, make sure to handle it before moving in.

4. Find the circuit breaker

If you were there during inspection, you should know where your junction box is, but if you don’t, finding it “should be the first and foremost thing that should be attended to,” Minto says. During a move, when you’re plugging all sorts of electrical doodads into the wall, you don’t want to be lost in the dark hunting for that elusive metal box. (While you’re there, find the water shut-off, too.)

Then, get familiar: If it’s not already well-marked, have your spouse or another family member stand in different parts of the house while you flip different switches, and make a note of which ones handle different rooms.

5. Deal with any water problems

Looking at that inspector’s report? Deal with water-related issues immediately, says Minto. These tend to be troublesome because they’re so easily ignored—”out of sight, out of mind,” he says. A leaky toilet might seem minor, but the steady drip can damage internal structural components.

Check your roof, too: If the rubber vent boots on your roof are leaking, you might not know it for a while.

“By the time they see it in a ceiling, there’s been a fair amount of water,” Minto says.

6. Caulk everything

This one isn’t mandatory, but caulking is a whole lot easier if you do it when the house is empty, letting you see all the nooks and crannies that might need a little sealing—and don’t forget the exterior. Minto says he sees caulking issues on “every home,” and while they might seem minor, it doesn’t take long before cracking gives way to leaks and even more water issues.

7. Plan your emergency exits

Before you begin bringing in furniture, walk through every room and decide how you would escape in an emergency. This can help you spot problem areas or rooms that need some adjustments—say, removing bars or adding egress windows to a basement.

8. Clean your gutters

BO-RING. Right? You can put this off until Day 2 of your big move, but don’t let the dullness of the task push you to procrastination: If the previous homeowners didn’t clean the gutters, you need to do so ASAP.

“I see gutters that are filled with organic materials start to rot and start to rust through,” Minto says. Take 30 minutes to clear them out, and you’ll be rewarded come the rainy season.

by Jamie Wiebe

Bethesda Home For Sale

 Bethesda home FOR SALE Single Family House

$1,795,000 4 Beds, 3.5 Baths

Description


Beautifully restored residence by the craftsmen of M.H. Holahan Builders. Extraordinary kitchen & family room space. Dazzling owner’s suite with spa bath, private office, expansive closets! Elegant finishes throughout. Crisp, fine detailing. Exceptionally special lot that is deep, lush, private & flat! The street & neighborhood are peaceful. Highly desirable Walt Whitman High School cluster!

Parking
Garage / 1 Space
Year Built
1957
Sq Footage
2604 sqft.
Lot Size
0.28 Acres

Beautiful Property!

Bethesda Home For Sale

Tracy Tkac 301-437-8722

tracy@eversco.com


$1,795,000

5813 Lenox Rd

Bethesda, MD 20817

 

D.C. Area Housing Market

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D.C.-Area Housing Market Is On a Roll

The Washington-area real estate market in January made steady gains in sales, inventory and prices, according to a report released Tuesday, building on improvements seen the month before at the end of what had largely been a stagnant year.

Typically, January is one of the slowest months of the year. But last month, according to analytics firm RealEstate Business Intelligence (RBI), a subsidiary of Rockville-based multiple-listing service MRIS, the market showed across-the-board progress.

Pending or under-contract sales increased 6.2 percent from 12 months before, the report said. During that same period, closed sales, median sales price and active inventory rose 4.5 percent, 4.1 percent and 17.9 percent respectively.

For most of last year, the Washington-area market was largely flat. But the new report builds on some improvements first seen in December, the only year-over-year sales gain in 2014, and offers evidence that the market is gaining momentum leading into the spring home-buying season.

“This likely means sales activity could exceed the 2014 levels in the spring,” said Corey Hart, RBI’s senior product manager who wrote the report. “We’re not predicting astronomical gains, but steady gains. Seeing contract activity pick up 11 percent in December and 6 percent in January is a leading indicator that sales activity into February and into March will be healthy increases.”

The report has good news for sellers and buyers.

For sellers, the median sales price during the 12-month period ending in January increased to $385,000 from $370,000, up 4.1 percent. Closed sales rose to 2,554 from 2,444, up 4.5 percent. Last month, there were 3,720 pending sales, 216 more than the year before.

For buyers, inventory, which had fallen sharply a few years ago, continued to rebound. There were 7,949 active listings, 1,204 more than the year before. There were also 1.7 percent more new listings.

Buyers were also able to win a slight negotiating edge over pricing – sellers were getting 95.7 percent of their original asking price, down from 96.6 percent the year before. Houses sold in an average of 65 days – up from 55 days a year ago – perhaps spurring sellers to lower their prices to close the deal.

“It’s an expensive area — more expensive homes sometimes don’t have as much demand as the more affordable segment,” Hart said. “It could be there are fewer buyers competing for those higher-price segments that we see.”

Among the jurisdictions RBI tracks in its monthly report, Fairfax City and Loudoun and Montgomery counties were the only communities to see a drop in their median sales price.

Prices rose 46 percent in Falls Church City, but the small sample size – nine – could be a factor.

Frederick County, Md., also had a big gain, jumping 21.7 percent to $280,000 last month from $230,000 in January 2014. Prices in Howard County rose 13.6 percent to $375,000 last month from $330,000 in January 2014.

Prices rose 6.9 percent, to $63,750, in Alexandria City and 5.3 percent, to $495,000, in the District.

By Dion Haynes; Washington Post February 10, 2015

Seller Disclosures

Seller Disclosures

It’s all too easy for property buyers to be lulled into a false sense of security by the seller’s reported disclosures about potential issues with the house you’re considering buying.

Although all states require some form of property disclosure statement, the extent of what must be revealed can vary from state to state, county to county and even city to city.

Federal law requires certain disclosures, such as the existence of asbestos or lead-based paint in the home or other known health or safety risks. But the enforcement of other disclosures (such as reporting certain environmental conditions pertinent to the area, or the existence of Megan’s Law offenders) will be determined by local ordinance or law.

The typical seller disclosure form is several pages long, and it asks the seller to report known defects in the home. This will include the appliances, as well as information about electrical, heating, sewer, water or other mechanical systems. The roof, foundation and other structural elements will be included in the report, as well as latent or hidden defects that are not apparent from a visual inspection, such as: the presence of mold, a crack in the foundation or a prior flooding problem.

Anything that is known — and that could pose a possible threat to the health or safety of the buyer — must be disclosed. If the seller is not aware of these problems, however, he is not obligated to hire an independent investigator unless that is stipulated in the purchase contract. Natural hazard risks, such as earthquake fault, fire or flood zones, should also be disclosed.

But just how detailed must the seller be? In most states, sellers are required to disclose only what they already know. They are not held responsible if they answer “no” or “unknown” to one or more disclosure questions. The disclosure paperwork defines the scope of liability for the seller, who “is not liable for any error, inaccuracy, or omission for information that is not within the scope of [his or her] actual knowledge.”

In other words, a seller could legitimately be unaware of serious problems — like a cracked foundation, termites deep in the walls or a roof on the verge of leaking. Under those circumstances, in most cases, the seller wouldn’t be held responsible.

Some states allow the seller to sign a waiver or disclaimer statement rather than require a full disclosure of all known defects. In Maryland, for example, if the seller opts to sign the Residential Disclaimer Statement and sell the property in its “as is” condition, he is required to report only latent defects. That means those that are not clearly apparent by visible inspection but pose a threat to the health or safety of the buyer or future occupant. Latent defects include the presence of mold behind the walls or a crack in the foundation.

You might assume that a newly built house would not have hidden problems, such as mold or an unstable foundation, but every buyer should still insist upon a full seller disclosure from the builder. Recently, a buyer purchased a new house, and before moving in removed a portion of the living room baseboard to install a built-in cabinet.

Behind the brand-new baseboard, he found black mold. Apparently, halfway through the construction phase the house had sat empty, and because of damp weather conditions the mold had established itself. Fortunately, after the building contractor was notified of the problem, a mold specialist was called, the floors and walls were treated, and all the damaged wood was replaced — at the seller’s expense.

In Virginia, sellers must disclose if their property is in any locality that includes a military air installation. While in the District, homeowners must report historical designation of their homes before selling.

Sandy Gadow- Washington Post

 

Pricing Your Home To Sell

Pricing Your Home To Sell

For The Most Money Possible In The Shortest Time Frame

      GetMedia-46

 

By Tracy Tkac

Evers & Co.

www.washingtonhg.com

 

The single most important factor to consider when selling a house is pricing the house correctly; it’s choosing the right list price: how much your house is worth. Over pricing the house will cause it to sit on the market and lose the freshness of the home’s appeal after the first two to three weeks of showings. After a month on the market, demand and interest can wane and after that a listing can become stale to potential buyers. It is a tough concept, because no one wants to chance leaving money on the table, but pricing the home just below fair market value will often cause a seller to receive multiple offers, which will then drive up the price to market price or above. Pricing is all about supply and demand. It’s part art and part science. Beware of the realtor that advises a list price way above the range of sold home prices in your neighborhood, choosing to list with that agent may be setting you up for the delay or even failure to sell your home.

 

Pricing your home to sell may not be as simple as you think. Looking at what similar homes in your immediate neighborhood that have sold for in the past 6 months to a year will give you some, but not all of the data you will need to calculate the list price. It is important to compare apples to apples when looking at the comparable recently sold homes. Compare and consider not just how many bedrooms or bathrooms, but also is the basement finished, is the yard nicely landscaped, how many garage spaces are offered? Look at homes’ sizes (square feet), style, condition and if updates and renovations have been done. A good real estate professional will format all of the information for you and help you to make the comparisons to come to the right listing price that will get you the most money possible for your home sale.

 

Using a real estate professional can save you money in the end by helping in pricing your home to sell quickly and for the best sale price. A good agent will assess what improvements should be made prior to putting your house on the market. Many times the first step is to de-clutter; when selling your home, the less-is-more concept is the way to go. Your agent should be honest and direct in telling you what needs painting and repair or replacing before making your listing “active on the market”. You only have one chance to make a good impression, and that goes for the list price and your homes presentation.